Article Abstract

Long noncoding RNAs regulate malignant phenotypes in colorectal cancer

Authors: Masahisa Ohtsuka, Masahiro Tanemura, Hiroki Akamatsu

Abstract

Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are functional RNAs that are transcribed from DNA but are not related to translation. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are over 200 nucleotides and are categorized as ncRNAs that affect cell processes, including transcription, remodeling, trafficking, and cell motility. Changes in the expression levels of lncRNAs affect the malignancy phenotype in various types of cancer. Furthermore, some lncRNAs affect the oncogenic pathway and aggravate the potential for malignancy in cancer. Hence, these RNAs are thought to be biomarkers and therapeutic targets for cancer. Because colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of deaths from cancer, new diagnostic strategies and therapies for CRC continue to be developed. New drugs, including molecular targeted drugs, have improved the outcome of CRC but remain insufficient. Several studies have shown a correlation between the expression level of lncRNAs and CRC. In this study, we review the lncRNAs that are associated with CRC and describe their potential as novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets.